Month: July 2017

Best Fly Fishing Gear for Beginners

Best Fly Fishing Gear for Beginners

For better or worse,  fly fishing requires a little more precision with your tackle than traditional bait or spin fishing.  You probably won’t notice poorly made gear much while your dragging a worm around on a hook,  but you will notice a difference when trying […]

Best Fly Patterns – Terrestrials

Best Fly Patterns – Terrestrials

What are the top terrestrial patterns from around the web?  The Fly Fish Guy has found the best impressionistic and confidence inspiring patterns for your viewing pleasure. # 1 – Unnamed Hopper by Fred Hannie This is truly an impressionistic pattern at its finest.  The […]

Terrestrial Week 2017

Terrestrial Week 2017

Begins July 23rd

Terrestrial Week is dedicated to chucking big bugs that catch big fish.  All week we’ll be featuring the best hopper, ant and beetle patterns from around the web as well as tips  and videos to help you be more successful on the water.  #terrestrialweek2017.

Improve your Fishing by Reading Books and Watching Videos

Improve your Fishing by Reading Books and Watching Videos

One of the best things that you can do to improve your fly fishing technique and catch more fish is to pursue the knowledge of others by reading books and watching videos.  There are so many resources available to us today, we’d be silly not […]

Beginners guide to reading water

Beginners guide to reading water

A key component to catching trout is to first locate the trout.  One of the most common mistakes I see beginner anglers make is casting aimlessly into the biggest pool they can find and hope something takes their fly.  While they are doing this, the […]

Tips For Better Indicator Nymph Fishing

Tips For Better Indicator Nymph Fishing

Trout spend 80% of their time feeding subsurface so if you want to catch more fish, you need to become a better nymph fisherman.  There are a few different options here but by far the easiest path to more fish is to master indicator nymphing.  These are a few essentials that I’ve learned that has helped me land more fish.

  1. Use weight!  Often times, the difference between catching fish and getting skunked is a split shot smaller than a BB.  If you don’t have your rig properly weighted, it takes longer during your drift to get the fly into the trout’s feeding zone and therefore chance to hook a fish.  I prefer using weighted nymphs that have either lead wraps or tungsten beads to help with the process.  A simple split shot kit tho is essential to ensure you have your rig properly weighted.  The rule of thumb here is if you’re not catching up on the bottom every few drifts, then add a small split shot.
  2. Reposition your indicator.  This tip assumes that you’re not hunkered down in that big deep pool that you think must be holding fish.  Instead you should be actively fishing which means you’re fishing the tailout, riffles and run of that same pool.  It should be obvious that the water in the middle of the pool is a hell of a lot deeper that the run at the top of the pool and the tailout at the end of the pool.   since this is the case, why do most fisherman keep their indicator 5 to 6 feet from the fly the entire day?   In the deep pools, this make sense but if you’re fish through the riffles and into the run at the head of the pool, that water may only be 18 inches deep but still holding good trout.  That means you have 4 feet of extra tippet drifting around aimless underneath your indicator.  All that slack translates to poor strike detection and less fish in your net.  Its critical that you understand the depth of water you’re fishing and constantly adjust your indicator to adapt to that water depth.  I try to keep my tippet length about 1.5x of the water depth (For water 2 feet deep, keep the tippet at 3 feet).  This gives enough slack to allow the fly to descend to depth while maintaining its drift.
  3. Mend your line.  I believe the most important aspect of nymph fishing is presentation.  If the fly looks to be drifting unnaturally through the water, the trout will not take it.  One of the most common influences to your flies drift is surface drag.  Your indicator and fly line are tethered to your fly so the more mass on the surface being pulled by the current, then the more your fly will be pulled along with it.  The answer to this however, is to mend your line.  This is a simple technique where following your cast, you take any of your extra fly line on the water and flip it with the tip of your rod upstream of the indicator.  If the line is above the indicator, then the pulling or drag effect from the surface current is minimized thus achieving a purer drift.

If you are able to learn these three tips, I guarantee that you’ll begin putting more fish in the net.

Getting most out of your HERO shot!

Getting most out of your HERO shot!

How many of you have ever taken pictures of your catch and sent it to your family or friends?  Do you do that to brag about how awesome you are or to just rub it in that you’re out fishing while they are stuck at […]

Jig Hooks Rock!

Jig Hooks Rock!

Yesterday was my introduction to fishing with tungsten weighted jig hooks.  The week prior I had done a video review of the Hanak jig style hooks and tied a few nymph patterns with these to give them a shot.  If you haven’t fished this style […]

My First Post

My First Post

I started Fly Fish Guy in 2017 to share my passion for fly fishing with you.  I’ve been fly fishing for over 15 years now and what was once a hobby to spend some time with my father has turned into a full blown obsession.  I love everything about the experience; the scenery, the flies, the process.  I became that guy who sits on the couch Saturday mornings watching YouTube videos on fly tying, euro nymphing, or any other fly fishing related content I could get my hands on.  This may sound a little lame, but in the end it fed my passion and helped enrich my experiences on the water.  That is why I created Fly Fish Guy, to help share what I’ve learned over the years and help you get the most out of your fly fishing experiences.  I hope to see you on the water.